412 Items Found
Page: 1 of 9
0 Items in Basket »
Short Parade Bayonet

Short Parade Bayonet

A good example of these attractive short bladed Parade Bayonets, complete with it’s original scabbard.
The nickel plated blade measures 199mm and is free from damage although it does have some light vertical surface scratches midway along. There are no maker details on the ricasso.
The black checkered grips are in very good undamaged condition as is the plated bird’s head pommel, the release button working well.
Finally, the scabbard is free from dents or damage with some loss to the black painted surface.

Code: 55001

125.00 GBP


Lion's Head German Artillery Officer's Sword

Lion's Head German Artillery Officer's Sword

A Lion’s Head Artillery Officer’s Sword by the maker Robert Klaas, without eagle and Swastika but most probably dating to the Third Reich Period
The grip is a black celluloid over a wooden core with eleven bands of double wire. The grip strap is brass with a gilt finish all nicely detailed over it’s full length from the ferrule through the lion’s mane to it’s head with it’s two faceted eyes
The P shaped grip guard is decorated with oak leaves and joins the crossguard and terminates with yet another lion’s head within a roll. At centre obverse is the langet here bearing the crossed artillery cannons the reverse with a centre shield with the initials VB crudely scratched in. Sitting above the crossguard is the oakleaf decorated ferrule.
Moving to the blade, the kissing cranes and Klaas name are visible below the langet. The blade is full length without damage and in near mint condition.
The scabbard has perhaps been repainted at some time and shows light pitting underneath the paint. Two thirds of the way down is the classic dent often associated with being shut in a door during wear. There is little strength holding the Sword within the scabbard which will slide out freely.
Finally, the Sword is complete with its sash type hanger which is in very good condition.

UK Shipping only

Code: 55000

500.00 GBP


Published Pre WW1 and WW1 RFC Identity Discs

Published Pre WW1 and WW1 RFC Identity Discs

This interesting artefact is from an early WW1 grouping of items attributed to Air Mechanic 859 Charles Albert Cordeaux RFC. The grouping was obtained from a relative's estate forty years ago and has remained in a private collection ever since. All the items from the Cordeaux grouping are listed on this site.
859 Charles Cordeaux was part of the very select few pre-WW1 Royal Flying Corps regulars (only about 1000 men).
His Army career began in 1901 when he enlisted in the infantry and from there he went on to specialise in the burgeoning Military Wireless Telegraphy.
In September 1913 he joined the nascent Royal Flying Corps (RFC) where after just a few months he was assigned to the Wireless Section of the newly formed No.6 Squadron as an Air Mechanic 1st Class. No.6 Squadron crossed the English Channel to join the War in support of IV Corps in October 1914 and it remained on the Western Front for the duration. In the early War period this Squadron had multiple roles and one of these was Spotting and Gun Ranging for the Artillery. To facilitate that role in 1915 the Squadron was one of the first in the RFC to experiment with Wireless Telegraphy in aircraft. In 1915 Cordeaux was deployed with the Squadron to Abeale Aerodrome in Belgium. Whilst there, being a Wireless Telegraphy expert, it appears he occasionally flew as an ad hoc Observer in these early Artillery Ranging by Wireless trials. It is assumed that Cordeaux only had such stints as an Observer occasionally during the period because all the issue flying kit from that time in his grouping is in exceptionally good order.
In early 1917 Cordeaux began a two year hiatus from Squadron Wireless Telegraphy when he was promoted to Sergeant Major and transferred to No.3 Stores Depot RFC in Milton England. He was Mentioned In dispatches there for good service in March 1918, and very shortly after he became an officer in the new RAF upon its formation that April. In January 1919 he finally returned to Squadron Wireless Telegraphy when he joined the Wireless Section of No.19 Training Squadron in Curragh Ireland as its technical officer. He was to remain in that capacity for a year before leaving the RAF for good in December 1919.
The Identity Discs offered here actually forms two different sets belonging to Cordeaux, though it seems both were worn together on a single cord. The single Aluminium Identity Disc is an exceptionally rare pre-war RFC disc, this Aluminium Pattern being the one used by the British Army at that time. Given the tiny size of the Royal Flying Corps pre-WW1 this Aluminium RFC Identity Disc is possibly the only such piece left today.
Once the First World War had started, the consequential huge expansion of the Army, along with an anticipated need to clearly identify the dead, meant the Single Aluminium pattern of Identity Disc was very quickly discarded. Just 17 days after Britain declared War on Germany the Fibre Identity Disc pattern was adopted in its place. Cordeaux's Aluminium Identity Disc is the very example featured in Mark Hillier's excellent book on the RFC, the "Royal Flying Corps Kitbag" (see page 212).
A lovely personal item to a pre-War RFC regular with an interesting career.

Code: 54999

Reserved


Important 1915 Pattern RFC Flying Cap - Published

Important 1915 Pattern RFC Flying Cap - Published

This most important piece, which in the brief official parlance of the RFC "1915 Scale Of Provision For Aeroplane Squadrons" (Issue Flying Kit List) is simply designated as "Caps, fur lined", is another artefact from an early WW1 grouping of items attributed to Air Mechanic 859 Charles Albert Cordeaux RFC.
For information on Cordeaux's career with the RFC (and later RAF) please refer to my earlier listing relating to his Identity Discs.
The Flying Cap offered here was perhaps issued to Cordeaux, a Wireless Technician, for his occasional aerial duties of 1915-16 and as such it is an extremely rare survivor of the very first General Issue of Flying Cap for the Royal Flying Corps of 1915, this pre-dating by over a year the General Issue "Caps leather, summer" (better known by its RAF re-designation of Mk1 Flying Cap).
The RFC was created in 1912 and at that time it was a very small unit. Up until 1914 Issue flying kit was very limited in number, as the number of Other Ranks Aircrew in this period was itself very limited. During this pre-WW1 period Issue flying headgear was of two specific types, either hard shell "helmets" to provide protection from shocks, or soft shell "caps" to provide protection from the cold, with the Issue of the hard shell protective helmet type dominating. When the War Department did Issue soft leather Flying Caps during this period, due to the very limited number needed these were mainly bought in small batches from the motoring trade and therfore a number of different patterns were worn. One of the most prevalent of these pre-WW1 Issue soft leather patterns however was the distinctive "Lappet" Pattern Flying Cap with it's long leather tapes (lappets) fastening at the top of the head; the pattern from which this Flying Cap is a direct descendant. A rare photograph of the RFC Issue Lappet Pattern Flying Cap is shown on page 23 of Mark Hillier's definitive book on the Royal Flying Corps, the full evolution of RFC Flying Headgear is copiously described in this book, for space reasons only a précis of the evolution can be given here).
After the outbreak of War in 1914 Military Aviation grew in size exponentially and so did the number of Other Ranks Aircrew. Very quickly it was found that the hard type protective flying helmets on dominant Issue to such Aircrew were impractical under wartime conditions and so by 1915 these were relegated to training use only. In order to fill the void and provide a practical piece of flying headgear for the large number of Other Ranks Aircrew now rapidly emerging, in 1915 the distinct pattern of "Caps fur lined" was added to the RFC Issue Flying Kit List (Scale Of Provision). This 1915 Pattern RFC Flying Cap was a simplified version of the pre-War Issue "Lappet" Pattern with the only difference in essence being that the long lappets were now converted to a more practical short chinstrap and buckle arrangement, this Pattern being sealed by the RFC in May 1915 as Pattern No. 8402 (see page 12 of Mark Hillier's book).
It would appear that the conversion was done at factory level from Issue Lappet Flying Cap "blanks" as visibly on this example there is no discernible difference between the chinstrap colour and the rest of the Flying Cap, plus the redundant leather channels at ear and skull level which guided the original lappets to the top of the head for fastening are still in position. It is assumed that the conversion was kept to such a basic necessity minimum by the RFC due to the expedience of the hour. The fact that the lappet ear and skull guiding channels remain in position on 1915 Pattern RFC Flying Caps does however make them easily recognisable in period photographs and an example of one such photo is shown on page 37 of Marc Hillier's book. Both Major James McCudden VC and Major "Mick" Mannock VC were Issued the 1915 Pattern RFC Flying Cap when they were Other Rank/Officer Cadets in the RFC, and both continued to wear it throughout their extensive flying careers as numerous period photos testify. McCudden's 1915 Pattern Flying Cap was removed from the site of his fatal crash of July 1918 and it is currently on display in the Imperial War Museum along with his Flying Gloves and Maternity Tunic. Images of that Flying Cap can be found online; as can be seen the Cap retains all the distinctive and redundant lappet guiding channels, is well used, and has darkened considerably due to the extensive wear.
In contrast to the latter however, this 1915 Pattern RFC Flying Cap is in near pristine condition. It has seen only light service wear as Cordeaux perhaps used the Flying Cap infrequently in the 1915-16 period that he was stationed at Abeale Aerodrome as he was not regular Aircrew (see Identity Discs Listing). At the end of his deployment at Abeale Cordeaux left Aerial Wireless Telegraphy altogether for two years and so this Cap was not used further. Upon his return to Aerial Wireless duties in 1919 the flying kit Cordeaux was to use was greatly impacted by the fact that the technology surrounding Aerial Wireless had considerably evolved during his two year absence. In the 1915-16 period when Cordeaux used this Flying Cap Observers transmitted Morse code messages ground wards to Artillery Batteries, but were not equipped with receivers and so did not require Flying Caps carrying headphones. However the introduction of air to ground Wireless Telephony (voice radio) in late 1917 led to the indispensable use of either, specially produced Flying Caps incorporating telephone pockets over the ears (see page 43 of Mark Hillier's book), or, much more commonly, earphones being worn slotted onto elastic straps so that they could be used with the standard Summer/MK1 Flying Cap now Issued, the substantial earphones being able to be held in place by that Cap's wide press-studded ear flaps. Since Cordeaux only ever flew in his capacity as a Wireless Technician he would not have been able to re-use his 1915 Pattern Flying Cap for this purpose upon his return to Aerial Wireless duties in 1919 as, not only did it not possess any such wide press-studded flaps, but also it was plainly now obsolete in regards to Aerial Wireless duties in any event due to its retained (and narrow) "lappet channels" covering the ears, this obviously making the fitting of any headphones whatsoever impossible. I believe that it is on account of Cordeaux having to use a totally different Pattern of Flying Cap for his flying duties in Ireland in 1919 that his 1915 Pattern Flying Cap has survived; there is no doubt that this Cap has remained in its beautiful lightly used 1915-16 state.
The leather is soft and pliable, with just two very small holes to the leather close to the front left hand edge when viewed. Wonderfully the Cap's leather retains its original light tan issue colour. All the stitching is without fault, the leather covering to the buckle is undamaged, and the fur is completely devoid of mothing or loss. It has a lovely Government Manufacturer's label stating a good size 7, plus the 1915 date; as well as having a clear Government Issue stamp of the letter "A" over broad arrow, indicating equipment intended for "Air use".
Aside from McCudden's in the Imperial War Museum, this is the only 1915 Pattern RFC Flying Cap in existence that I know of.
These stopgap "Caps, fur lined" were only Issued for a little over a year before being superseded by the "Caps leather, summer" (Mk1 Flying Cap) in the latter part of 1916. The scale of manufacture itself was far smaller than for the Mk1 Flying Cap which was manufactured in far greater numbers and for far longer.
The RFC Scale Of Provision For Aeroplane Squadrons for 1915 states that only 25 of these Caps were designated per Squadron that year (see page 4 of Mark Hillier's book). It is little wonder therefore that the 1915 Pattern RFC Flying Cap is so rare today. Given the rarity this actual Cap is the one featured in Mark Hillier's book to demonstrate the 1915 Pattern RFC Flying Cap - "Caps, fur lined" (see pages: 25, 48, & 49).
An undeniably important Flying Cap in the evolution of RFC Issue Flying Headgear, in incredible condition, and quite possibly the sole survivor of the type in private hands.

Code: 54998

Reserved


Published 1915 Issue RFC Observer's Pattern Flying Goggles

Published 1915 Issue RFC Observer's Pattern Flying Goggles

These scarce 1915 Issue RFC Observer Pattern Flying Goggles are another artefact from an early WW1 grouping of items attributed to Air Mechanic 859 Charles Albert Cordeaux RFC. For information on Cordeaux's career with the RFC (and later RAF) please refer to my earlier listing relating to his Identity Discs.
These Flying Goggles perhapsissued to Cordeaux, a Wireless Technician, for his occasional aerial duties of 1915-16 when he flew as and ad hoc Observer. They date from the early 1915 period as later in 1915 the first "Goggle Masks" began to be issued to RFC Aircrew; this because simple Goggles such as these were proving themselves to be more and more inadequate in providing protection against the cold, as aircraft speeds, and thus "wind chill", steadily increased.
By late 1916 the issue of Goggle Masks became universal and this simple non-mask goggle type was relegated to issue in hot climates only. Cordeaux's Goggles appear on the RFC Issue Flying Kit List (Scale Of Provision) for 1915 under the simple designation "Goggles with triplex glasses". The stated "glasses" could be changed by loosening a screw on the Goggle's frames, and in this regard the 1915 Kit List further states the glasses came in two specified Patterns: "light or dark tinted". The dark tint, such as the ones on these Goggles was provided specifically for the use of Observers as one of their roles was to regularly scan the skies for enemy aircraft and this task was thought to be made easier with the use of a dark tint to the glasses. Given that there were considerably fewer Observers than Pilots, Flying Goggles with the "dark tinted" glasses applied are considerably scarcer than their "light" glasses counterpart.
Like all of Cordeaux's flying kit for the 1915-16 period, the Flying Googles are in exceptionally good just lightly used condition. Cordeaux only flew occasionally in the 1915-16 period, followed by a two year hiatus from flying altogether thereafter, hence the Goggles here not being used by him beyond that time. Similarly to the situation with his 1915 Flying Cap, by the time of Cordeaux's return to Aerial Wireless duties in 1919 these Flying Goggles were obsolete, rendered so by the increased aircraft speeds necessitating the use of the MK1 Goggle Mask. As with the 1915 Flying Cap, I believe that it is on account of Cordeaux having to use a totally different type of Flying Goggles for his flying duties in Ireland in 1919 (the MK1 Goggle Mask) that his 1915 Issue Observer Pattern Flying Goggles have survived. There is no doubt that these Goggles have remained in their beautiful lightly used 1915-16 state. because of that.
The Goggles are completely without damage. There is no loss to the Goggles fur trim, and its khaki strap's adjustment buckle, and hook and eye closure, function correctly. All the leather parts retain their original light tan issue colour and these of course match Cordeaux's 1915 Pattern Flying Cap worn with them quite wonderfully. Though faint, the goggle strap's leather tab on the left hand side bears a Government Issue stamp of the letter "A" over broad arrow, this indicating equipment intended for "Air use".
They have retained their original Triplex case and this too is in very good condition, completely damage free.
These very Goggles are featured in Mark Hillier's book on the RFC at pages 48 & 49.
A scarce early piece of RFC Issue Flying Kit in excellent condition.

Code: 54997

Reserved


Published 1915 Dated RFC Observer Pattern Flying Gauntlets

Published 1915 Dated RFC Observer Pattern Flying Gauntlets

These scarce 1915 Issue RFC Observer Pattern Flying Gauntlets are another artefact from an early WW1 grouping of items attributed to Air Mechanic 859 Charles Albert Cordeaux RFC. For information on Cordeaux's career with the RFC (and later RAF) please refer to my earlier listing relating to his Identity Discs.
These Flying Gauntlets were perhaps issued to Cordeaux, a Wireless Technician, for his occasional aerial duties of 1915-16 when he flew as an ad hoc Observer. They appear on the RFC Issue Flying Kit List (Scale Of Provision) for 1915 under the simple designation "Gauntlets, observers". This trigger-finger mitten style of Gauntlet was the first Pattern specifically introduced for Observers by the RFC. By the end of the War the Pattern was obsolete, abandoned in favour of the much more practical, and universal, Urwick-Fownes Pattern; this being a two-in-one glove/gauntlet with fold back mitten, introduced in 1917.
As a precursor to the adoption of the Urwick-Fownes Pattern, for extra warmth in winter the 1915 Observer Pattern Flying Gauntlet could be worn with a separate leather liner glove inserted. A pair of such liner gloves were also found in Cordeaux's grouping and I have listed them separately.
These "Gauntlet, observers" have a clear Government Manufacturer's mark for 1915, as well a much fainter Government Issue broad arrow stamp. I believe the fact that this latter stamp is a simple broad arrow marking without the letter "A" above it for "Air use" indicates that these Observer Gauntlets, which are unequivocally for Air Use, were manufactured very early on in 1915. This pre-dating the introduction of the specific letter "A" over broad arrow marking first seen just a little later that year and applied to the remainder of Cordeaux's 1915 kit
Like all of Cordeaux's flying kit for the 1915-16 period, these Flying Gauntlets are in exceptionally good just lightly used condition. Cordeaux only flew occasionally in the 1915-16 period, followed by a two year hiatus from flying altogether thereafter, hence the Gauntlets not being used by him beyond that time. Similarly to the situation with his 1915 Flying Cap and Goggles, by the time of Cordeaux's return to Aerial Wireless duties in 1919 the Flying Gauntlets were obsolete; rendered so by the popular Urwick-Fownes Pattern Gauntlet which by 1919 was blanket General Issue throughout the RAF, and which would continue to be so well into the 20's.
As with the 1915 Flying Cap and Goggles, I believe that it is because Cordeaux used a totally different Pattern of Flying Gauntlets for his flying duties in Ireland in 1919 that his 1915 Issue Observer Pattern Flying Gauntlets have survived. There is no doubt that these Gauntlets have remained in their beautiful lightly used 1915-16 state for that rason.
The Gauntlets are completely without damage. All stitching is without fault and there is no loss to the woollen lining. The leather is soft and pliable, retaining its original light tan issue colour throughout, this matching Cordeaux's 1915 Flying Cap and Goggles quite wonderfully.
These very nice Flying Gauntlets are understandably featured in Mark Hillier's book on the RFC at page 63.
A scarce piece of early RFC Issue Flying Kit in amazing condition.

Code: 54996

Reserved


Published 1915 Dated RFC Flying Gloves / Gauntlet Liners

Published 1915 Dated RFC Flying Gloves / Gauntlet Liners

These scarce 1915 Issue RFC Flying Gloves/Gauntlet Liners are another artefact from an early WW1 grouping of items attributed to Air Mechanic 859 Charles Albert Cordeaux RFC. For information on Cordeaux's career with the RFC (and later RAF) please refer to my earlier listing relating to his Identity Discs.
The Gloves/Liners were perhaps issued to Cordeaux, a Wireless Technician, for his occasional aerial duties of 1915-16 when he flew as an ad hoc Observer. I believe these Gloves are a variation of the "Gloves, chamois leather" that appear on the RFC Issue Flying Kit List (Scale Of Provision) for 1915, and that in contrast to the standard versions of such Gloves these were made solely to be used as Flying Gauntlet Liners in winter, and Flying Gloves worn on their own in summer. The standard "Gloves, chamois leather" actually had a dual purpose in the RFC, they were not only used by aircrew to line their Gauntlets for extra warmth in winter, but also used by ground crew when doping aircraft in cold weather, this latter use in fact being their original purpose. Hence, though the Gloves are unlined, very soft, and with a single closure press stud, all in exactly the same manner of their standard chamois leather counterpart, they are however manufactured in the classic light tan chrome leather from which only Flying Kit is made in the RFC. Equally important of course is the fact that they bear the Government Issue stamp of the letter "A" over broad arrow, indicating equipment intended specifically for "Air use".
It is known that both Major "Mick" Mannock VC and Major James McCudden VC used just this Pattern of Gloves for flying in the summer. It is thought expert fighter pilots preferred using such lightweight Flying Gloves for their flexibility when it was warm enough to do so. McCudden's Flying Gloves were removed from the site of his fatal crash of July 1918 and they are currently on display in the Imperial War Museum along with his 1915 Pattern Flying Cap and Maternity Tunic. Images of those Flying Gloves can be found online; as can be seen they are the identical pattern to these Gloves with the only difference being that, similarly to his 1915 Pattern Flying Cap, the light tan issue colour of McCudden's 1915 Gloves has now darkened considerably due to the extensive wear. (It is interesting to note that both McCudden and Cordeaux, who were both rare pre-War 1913 entrants to the RFC with service numbers just 33 digits apart, were both issued, and flew with, the exact same 1915 Pattern Flying Cap/Flying Glove combination. This suggesting perhaps that these items were on issue together to Other Rank Aircrew early on in the War).
In contrast to McCudden's however, these 1915 Issue RFC Flying Gloves/ Gauntlet Liners are in exceptionally good just lightly used condition. Cordeaux only flew occasionally in the 1915-16 period, followed by a two year hiatus from flying altogether thereafter, hence the Flying Gloves/ Gauntlet Liners not being used by him beyond that time.
Since Cordeaux was not a fighter pilot like McCudden, he only used these Flying Gloves as winter Liners to his 1915 Observer Pattern Flying Gauntlets when doing his occasional Observer stints. By the time of Cordeaux's return to Aerial Wireless duties in 1919 the 1915 Observer Pattern Flying Gauntlets with their separate winter Gauntlet Liners were obsolete; rendered so by the much more practical two-in-one glove/gauntlet Urwick-Fownes Pattern, which by 1919 was blanket General Issue throughout the RAF. As with all his obsolete 1915 Flying Kit, I believe that it is on account of Cordeaux using a totally different Pattern of Flying Gauntlets for his flying duties in Ireland in 1919 that his 1915 Issue Flying Glove/Gauntlet Liners have survived.
The Gloves/Liners are completely without damage. All stitching is without fault and both closure press studs function correctly. The leather is soft and pliable, retaining its original light tan issue colour throughout, this matching Cordeaux's 1915 Flying Cap, Goggles and Gauntlets quite wonderfully. They bear no markings aside from the "Air use" Government Issue stamp however,I believe they must date from 1915 since every other item of Cordeaux's flying kit in this grouping is from that year. In that regard these marvellous Flying Gloves/ Gauntlet Liners are featured next to Cordeaux's Flying Gauntlets in Mark Hillier's book (see page 62).
An exquisite piece of RFC Issue Flying Kit, demonstrably favoured by "Aces".

Code: 54995

Reserved


1915 Dated RFC Issued Map Case

1915 Dated RFC Issued Map Case

This 1915 RFC Issued Map Case is another artefact from an early WW1 grouping of items attributed to Air Mechanic 859 Charles Albert Cordeaux RFC. For information on Cordeaux's career with the RFC (and later RAF) please refer to my earlier listing relating to his Identity Discs.
This Map Case was perhaps issued to Cordeaux, a Wireless Technician, for his occasional aerial duties of 1915-16 when he flew as an ad hoc Observer (trialling Wireless Gun Ranging for the Artillery etc.). The Case itself is a standard British Army Issue Map Case dated 1915 with the standard broad arrow Government Issue mark. Thr use of standard Army equipment for air needs is very typical of early War aviation. By the latter stages of the War the RFC had developed a wide range of distinct Air equipment especially suited to its functions.
Like all of Cordeaux's kit for the 1915-16 period, the Map Case is in very good condition. I would say however that it has had slightly more wear than his regular flying kit, this no doubt indicating that before being specifically issued to Cordeaux for his flying, the Map Case had unsurprisingly seen more general service in the RFC.
Cordeaux only flew occasionally in the 1915-16 period, followed by a two year hiatus from flying altogether thereafter, hence the Case not being used by him beyond that time.
By the time of Cordeaux's return to Aerial Wireless duties in 1919 such "loose" Map Cases were obsolete for flying purposes, rendered so by specially designed items such as the RFC/RAF Mk1 Map Board (see page 107 of Mark Hillier's book).
As with all his obsolete 1915 Flying Kit, I believe that it is on account of Cordeaux using totally different Map equipment for his flying duties in Ireland in 1919 that his 1915 RFC Issued Map Case has survived.
The Map Case is in good solid undamaged condition. The leather shoulder strap is strong with the brass clips at each end functioning correctly. All stitching to the Case itself is without fault and the closure studs function correctly. Finally the celluloid "window" is unbroken, unscratched, and clear. This actual Map Case is featured on page 105 of Mark Hillier's book on the RFC.
A good example of early RFC Issued Army Equipment for Air Use.

Code: 54994

Reserved


1915 RFC Issued Compass

1915 RFC Issued Compass

This 1915 RFC Issued Compass and accoutrements is another artefact from an early WW1 grouping of items attributed to Air Mechanic 859 Charles Albert Cordeaux RFC. For information on Cordeaux's career with the RFC (and later RAF) please refer to my earlier listing relating to his Identity Discs.
The Compass and accoutrements were perhaps issued to Cordeaux, a Wireless Technician, for his occasional aerial duties of 1915-16 when he flew as an ad hoc Observer (trialling Wireless Gun Ranging for the Artillery etc.).
The Compass itself is a standard British Army Issue Compass in the nice brass body format, this dated 1915 with the standard broad arrow Government Issue mark. The Compass's Case is engaging however, since it is not in the standard format for the type. On these Issue Army Compasses the Case usually has one long retaining strap so that the Compass may be hung about the body. Here there is no such strap, nor indeed the fittings for one (these visibly absent from the bottom of the case). Instead the case is fitted with a belt loop, a feature that standard Issue Army Compass Cases do not have. I believe this variation is no accident, but rather an early attempt by the RFC to make standard Army equipment more suitable for Aircrew use in an aircraft, the Compass Case being secured to the Flying Jacket's belt is simply more practical.
As the War went on the RFC developed this idea further and by the latter stages of WW1 special Aircrew designs of smaller Compass, secured to the wrist or thigh, are what was on issue to Aircrew (see pages 116 & 117 of Mark Hillier's book on the RFC). The probability that this pattern of Compass Case is a special early design for RFC Aircrew is upheld by the fact that the Case has the letter "A" over broad arrow mark designating equipment explicitly intended for "Air use", and significantly, no other mark (unlike Cordeaux' standard issue Map Case - see earlier listing). Also, still to avoid loss in the slipstream, Cordeaux has, rather nicely, additionally clipped an Army lanyard to the Compass's brass ring so that the instrument on it's own may be secured when in use, this by looping the lanyard too to the Flying Jacket belt (or shoulder when no Jacket is worn). Adapting standard Army equipment in this fashion is very typical of early War aviation.
Like all of Cordeaux's kit for the 1915-16 period, the Compass and Case is in very good condition. I would say however that the Compass has perhaps had very slightly more use than the Case, this no doubt a further indication that the Case is a special RFC Aircrew adaptation, and that before being specifically issued to Cordeaux for his flying, the Compass had unsurprisingly seen more general service in the RFC (similarly to his Map Case).
Cordeaux only flew occasionally in the 1915-16 period, followed by a two year hiatus from flying altogether thereafter, hence the Compass and Case presented here not being used by him beyond that time. By the time of Cordeaux's return to Aerial Wireless duties in 1919 such standard issue Army Compasses were obsolete for flying purposes, rendered so by specially designed items such as the smaller wrist and thigh Compasses mentioned earlier. As with all his obsolete 1915 Flying Kit, I believe that it is on account of Cordeaux using totally different Compass equipment for his flying duties in Ireland in 1919 that his 1915 RFC Issued Compass and Case have survived.
Both Compass and Case are in very good solid undamaged condition. The Compass is fully functioning with it's face rotating freely to give what still appears to be an accurate reading, and its locking buttons and lid hinge are working correctly. Finally, the Compass's glass viewing "window" is clear and without cracks.
The Compass is precision Swiss made, 1915 dated, and bears a Government Issue broad arrow mark. Its leather case is equally pleasing. The leather is sturdy, all the stitching is strong, the closure strap is pliable and its buckle works well with no issues. Finally the Compass's khaki securing lanyard is complete, intact , with it's brass sprung clip functioning perfectly.
This actual Compass, Case and Lanyard are featured on page 105 of Mark Hillier's book on the RFC.
A wonderful example of early RFC Issued Army Equipment adapted for Air Use, in very nice condition.

Code: 54993

Reserved


Private Purchase RFC Observer Wing

Private Purchase RFC Observer Wing

This Private Purchase RFC Observer Wing is one of three different brevets found in an early WW1 (1915-16) grouping of items attributed to Air Mechanic 859 Charles Albert Cordeaux RFC. Cordeaux was a Wireless Telegraphy expert who occasionally flew as ad hoc Observer (trialling Wireless Gun Ranging for the Artillery etc.). However since Cordeaux was not an "official" Observer it is thought that he most likely acquired these Wings unofficially at some later time. perhaps to reflect his Aircrew experience when necessary.
For further information on Cordeaux's career with the RFC (and later RAF) please refer to my earlier listing relating to his Identity Discs.
This Observer Wing is the desirable "khaki feathers" version, this rarer style being sought after by collectors as the Wing is easily discernible from post WW1 items.
The Observer Wing was first authorised for wear by Officers in August 1915, khaki feathered versions of this type being worn for the duration.
The Wing is in good service worn condition, clearly removed from a uniform. In my experience true WW1 Observer Wings such as this are significantly harder to find than their RFC Pilot Wing counterpart.
A delightful khaki feathered WW1 Observer Wing.

Code: 54992

Reserved


Issue RFC Observer Wing

Issue RFC Observer Wing

This Issue RFC Observer Wing is one of three different brevets found in an early WW1 (1915-16) grouping of items attributed to Air Mechanic 859 Charles Albert Cordeaux RFC.
Cordeaux was a Wireless Telegraphy expect who occasionally flew as ad hoc Observer (trialling Wireless Gun Ranging for the Artillery etc.). However since Cordeaux was not an "official" Observer it is thought that he most likely acquired these Wings unofficially at some later time, perhaps to reflect his Aircrew experience when necessary.
For further information on Cordeaux's career with the RFC (and later RAF) please refer to my earlier listing relating to his Identity Discs.
This Issue RFC Observer Wing is the Regulation Issue Pattern for WW1, this first authorised for wear by Other Ranks in October 1915 and worn for the duration.
The Wing is in good service worn condition, clearly removed from a uniform. In my experience true WW1 Observer Wings such as this are significantly more difficult to find than their RFC Pilot Wing counterpart.
A classic WW1 Observer Wing.

Code: 54991

Reserved


WW1 RAF Bullion Observer Wing

WW1 RAF Bullion Observer Wing

This WW1 RAF Bullion Observer Wing is one of three different brevets found in an early WW1 (1915-16) grouping of items attributed to Air Mechanic 859 Charles Albert Cordeaux RFC.
Cordeaux was a Wireless Telegraphy expert who occasionally flew as ad hoc Observer (trialling Wireless Gun Ranging for the Artillery etc.) However since Cordeaux was not an "official" Observer it is thought that he most likely acquired these Wings unofficially at some later time.
For further information on Cordeaux's career with the RFC (and later RAF) please refer to my earlier listing relating to his Identity Discs.
The WW1 Bullion Observer Wingis the rare Special Pattern authorised for wear on the First Pattern Pale Blue RAF Uniform of 1918. The Pale Blue RAF Uniform was only worn for about a year. It was replaced with the RAF Grey-Blue Uniform in September 1919 at which time the Bullion Observer Wing was discontinued, the brevet reverting to an off-white worsted embroidery design. This Pattern of Brevet, - gold bullion to the wing and silver bullion to the "O", is also seen worn on the RFC Blue Patrol Tunic, and sometimes too on the Khaki RAF 1918 tunic.
The Wing is in good service worn condition with the Bullion in good order. It shows clear signs of having been removed from a uniform. In my experience WW1 Bullion Observer Wings such as this are significantly more difficult to find than their Bullion RAF Pilot Wing counterpart.
A very rare wing.

Code: 54989

Reserved


Faithful Service Decoration for Twenty-Five Years' Service.

Faithful Service Decoration for Twenty-Five Years' Service.

Silvered metal and black enamels with original ribbon and pinback.
Contained in it’s red cardboard box of issue, marked "25" on the lid.
Both decoration and box are in very good condition

Code: 54988

60.00 GBP


K98k Ammunition Pouches

K98k Ammunition Pouches

A good early pair of German Cartridge / Ammunition pouched for 7.92 ammunition for the Kar 98 k Rifle.
Constructed in a black pebbled leather both pouches are in very good used condition with all straps and internal dividers in place, the only point of note being the loss of one of the two rows of stitching holding one closure strap where it is attached to the lid, the second row of stitching still holding it firmly in place.
Both have good markings one being dated 1938, the other 1939

Code: 54987

Reserved


Very Early Silver Lion's Head SS Sword by WKC

Very Early Silver Lion's Head SS Sword by WKC

An early Silver Lion’s Head Sword by the maker WKC, dating from between 1935 - 36
The grip is a black celluloid over a wooden core with eleven bands of interwoven silver wire, the celluloid intact but with one crack at the top from the Lion’s mane down as far as the second row of wire bands.
The grip strap is nicely detailed over it’s full length from the ferrule through the lion’s head with it’s two faceted eyes, all heavily silver plated.
The P shaped grip guard is also heavily silver plated and decorated with oak leaves turning to hand finished fern leaves as it joins the crossguard which is again silver plated and terminating with yet another lion’s head within a roll. At centre obverse is the langet here bearing the all important early style SS eagle and Swastika, the reverse with a centre oval to allow for a dedication. Sitting above the crossguard is the silver plated and oakleaf decorated ferrule.
Moving to the blade the Knight’s head of WKC is clearly visible below the langet. The blade is full length without damage but does show marking overall which I am told can be polished out. I have left it as it is.
Finally, the scabbard is without damage but has one screw missing at the throat and shows paint chipping overall.
The hand tooling and finish of this Sword far surpasses anything similar on the market today. An exceptionally rare Sword and quite possibly made for someone of importance.

Code: 54986

6000.00 GBP


Sleeve Badge for Ski Qualified Troops

Sleeve Badge for Ski Qualified Troops

Another exceptionally rare Sleeve Badge worn on the upper right arm by Heer and SS Troops from rifle units qualified in the use of snow skis.
This uniform removed example is the still more rare being of BeVo weave construction rather than embroidered thread on a wool backing.
Overall condition is very good, the edges of the rayon baking folded in prior to application.
The first I have been able to offer.

Code: 54562

595.00 GBP


A Collection of British Khaki Drill Uniform Items

A Collection of British Khaki Drill Uniform Items

A collection of British Khaki Drill uniform items, comprising:
Wolseley Pattern Solar Helmet
Bush Jacket / Shirt
Shorts.
The cork Wolseley Pattern Solar Hemet has the correct six panels with ventilated dome. Outside, the cloth shows evidence of perspiration with wear to the covering on the ventilation fitting. Inside, the lining is a green baize, the sweatband dated 1942, 6 ¾, Failsworth hats Ltd. and 1942. The sweatband is partially detached from the helmet and there is no chinstrap. Complete with what appears to be it’s original carrying cover, itself rather scarce. The Helmet is accompanied by a pair of aluminium framed googles of unknown origin in poor to fair condition only.
This Bush Jacket or Shirt is made in Khaki drill rather than Aertex and is in overall very good condition. Four patch pockets with five button front closure, the top button partly missing and with an epaulette to each shoulder. No label but approximately a 40” chest.
Shorts are the 1942 pattern without belt loops and have two adjustable straps to the front and a four button fly. At each side is a slash pocket with dressings pocket on the right. Very good condition with no label but about a 30” waist.

Code: 54535

250.00 GBP


Krim Shield

Krim Shield

Krim Shield for Ground Forces
Although missing its backing plate and cloth along with one prong, this Krim Shield is in otherwise very good displayable condition with some rusting to the reverse.
Instituted by Hitler in July 1942 for wear by all personnel who were “Honorably engaged in the fighting in the Crimea” either on land, sea or in the air for a period of at least three months. These battle shields were worn on the left sleeve

Code: 54319

85.00 GBP


DAF / DRB Cap Insignia

DAF / DRB Cap Insignia

Cap Badge with DAF insignia superimposed on the winged railway insignia.
Constructed in alloy with a silver wash the badge is in mint unissued condition with all three prongs present and folded, the centre prong covering the markings RZM M1/58

Code: 54134

115.00 GBP


Army Officer's Pin Back Eagle for Summer Tunic

Army Officer's Pin Back Eagle for Summer Tunic

A nice early pin back Eagle for wear on the Heer white summer tunic.
Constructed in Tombak or cupal the eagle retains most of the original silvered finish with a pleasing copper colour showing through slightly on some of the high points.
On the reverse the horizontal pin and catch are in place as is the vertical securing hook. The hook has been slightly compressed and should be eased open and the catch would be better pinched a little more closed.

Code: 54983

100.00 GBP


Swastika Kill Panel. Possibly US P40 Relic.

Swastika Kill Panel. Possibly US P40 Relic.

Measuring approximately 320mm x 120mm this section of fuselage panel shows the remains of three black hand painted Swastikas on a sand coloured background.
Research suggests this is perhaps from a US fighter, possibly a Curtis P-40 but in truth it could be from any US fighter presumably operating in the North African theatre. Measurement of the aluminium gauge rules out a British aircraft and I am told the recessed rivet holes and shade of the primer on the inside, also support the US theory. Coupled with that the uncranked Swastika was very much an American practice.
As with everything I offer, this panel is guaranteed original and has some interesting history of ownership which I can pass to the buyer

Code: 54982

650.00 GBP


Hitler Youth Bread Bag with Label & Strap

Hitler Youth Bread Bag with Label & Strap

Whilst numerous Bread Bags are offered as Hitler Youth bags these are most commonly simply interwar commercially produced pieces produced for hikers and walkers.
True Hitler Jugend Bread Bags will carry the correct label with the HJ diamond and RZM markings as we have here.
This example is in very good used condition, completely free from damage. All dished aluminium buttons are in place along with all straps and most importantly the carrying strap.
A true example of the type and a rare find.

Code: 54981

Reserved


LBA Marked Luftwaffe Helmet Chinstrap

LBA Marked Luftwaffe Helmet Chinstrap

An absolute must for anyone owning an early Luftwaffe M35 Helmet is the profusely unit marked Luftwaffe Chinstrap.
Overall condition is very good, the leather remaining soft and supple. The buckle is aluminium as are both studs and the long strap is full length. No manufacture’s details remain visible.
Despite extensive research I have however been unable to identify the unit markings. Prominent is LBA (Luftwaffe Bekleidungs Ambt.) along with “Stu W Komp” and “L.D. L. N. S.” which remain a mystery.
A very difficult to find Luftwaffe chinstrap.

Code: 54979

300.00 GBP


Official ETO Photograph. German Officers Captured in France

Official ETO Photograph. German Officers Captured in France

An Official European Theatre of Operations Photograph which purports to show German Officers captured in France awaiting Interrogation in England in a POW camp.
the picture which measures 136mm x 95mm is in very good condition and very interesting. The barbed wire behind the officers appears to have been edited in to the picture and how strange that even after arriving in England one still has his gas mask and another even a pistol holster. Even empty this would have been taken from him. British creative propaganda?

Code: 54978

Reserved


Official War Office Photograph. German Ammunition Bunker

Official War Office Photograph. German Ammunition Bunker

A British Official War Office Photograph measuring 153mm x 100mm printed on poor quality paper and entitled “Underground German Ammunition Bunkers Discovered” with text”. Taken I believe in Italy.

Code: 54977

10.00 GBP


Official British Press Photo. German prisoners, Gustave Line. Fallschirmjager

Official British Press Photo. German prisoners, Gustave Line. Fallschirmjager

Original 133mm x 110mm British Press Photograph on poor quality paper, the reverse stamped to the “Tropical press Agency”, Used 12 Jul 1944 and typed caption: German Officers under guard, captured during the Eighth Armies break-through at the Gustave Line, are marched to the rear under escort.
Very good condition

Code: 54976

Reserved


Cased 1939 Iron Cross First Class by Klein und Quenzer

Cased 1939 Iron Cross First Class by Klein und Quenzer

Perhaps best described as an entry level example, this Iron Cross First Class by Klein und Quenzer is complete with its’ original award case.
The Cross itself is free from structural damage but the black painted magnetic core has taken on a somewhat rough appearance with age. The reverse is nicely toned, the coffin pin, hinge and catch all in place, the pin stamped 65.
The case is a little scruffy with a small amount of wear to the lid insert but with hinge and release catch working well.

Code: 54974

240.00 GBP


Cased Iron Cross First Class by Steinhauer and Luck

Cased Iron Cross First Class by Steinhauer and Luck

A pin back Iron Cross first Class by Steinhauer and Luck, complete with its’ original case of presentation.
The Iron Cross is in very good condition, lightly toned and with absolutely no damage, the coffin shaped pin is marked 4 to the maker and the hinge, pin and catch are without damage.
The case is also in very good condition and correct for the maker.
A very nice example.

Code: 54973

SOLD


Wound Badge in Silver

Wound Badge in Silver

A later war Wound Badge in Silver, the reverse marked 92 for the maker Josef Ruckert & Sohn.
Despite being zinc the badge has retained most of the original finish and is free from damage with the hinge, pin and catch all still in place

Code: 54972

SOLD


Fallschirmjäger Officer’s Hand Embroidered  Parachute Qualification Badge

Fallschirmjäger Officer’s Hand Embroidered Parachute Qualification Badge

A quite beautiful example of a Luftwaffe Fallschirmjäger officer’s Parachute Qualification badge in cloth, intended for wear on the Fliegerbluse.
Whilst the wreath and Swastika are made of the standard twisted aluminium thread the eagle is formed in Celleon thread with the features highlighted in a darker thread, the use of Celleon no doubt making it more robust and less likely to sustain damage.
The cloth is the high quality ribbed Trikot material seen on privately purchased uniforms, the edges of which show the remains of the hand stitching used to attach it to the Fliegerbluse. To the reverse virtually all of the paper covering remains.
A rare variant of a highly desirable Fallschirmjäger officer’s badge

Code: 54837

2800.00 GBP


4 POW Letters Including one Unissued from Stalag Luft 3

4 POW Letters Including one Unissued from Stalag Luft 3

A collection of four WW11 Prisoner of war letters comprising:
One unused but pre stamped Stalag Luft 3 German Postkarte in very good condition.
Two used and completed German Postkarte sent by Private C Rattray 2758020 ( POW number 16776) of the Black Watch from Stalag 20B at Marienburg in Germany. Dated June 1944 with both German and British censor stamps. Completed in pencil and quite difficult to read but both in good condition.
One British POW Letter Card, unused and in excellent condition still with it’s original paper wrapping sleeve which once held eight letter cards.

Code: 54678

35.00 GBP


1936 pattern Police Belt and Buckle

1936 pattern Police Belt and Buckle

A very good service used example of a 1936 pattern Enlisted Man’s Police Belt and Buckle.
One piece aluminium box Belt Buckle with pebbled field and central Swastika motif with oak leaf wreath and Got Mit Uns, the reverse with CTD ( Christian Theodor Dicke) raised in the casting. The original 1938 dated tab remains attached to the buckle.
The Belt is approximately 37” in length and remains supple and free from damage other than slight loss to the stitching to the tongue. The clasp end has some stamping but this is no longer discernible.
Overall condition is very good.

Code: 54971

Reserved


Wehrmacht Clergy Armband

Wehrmacht Clergy Armband

An extremely rare cotton and rayon mix Armband for a member of the Wehrmacht Clergy. At centre is the machine embroidered red cross of a non combatant flanked by a 53mm wide purple band extending around the armband and sewn in at the seam.
Below the right arm of the red cross is what appears to be an area or region stamp but the wording is not discernible.
Prior to the introduction of conscription in 1935, there were only 8 full time chaplains of all denominations, supervised by 2 military bishops, in the entire German Army. In 1942 there were roughly 480 protestant chaplains, and a roughly similar number of catholic chaplains. The total number of chaplains in the Army in the Second War was only about one fourth of that in the First War.
In spite of the massive number of applicants, it seems no new chaplains were appointed after 1942. Prerequisites for applicants were: they had to be born before 1909, though there were exceptions, they needed the approval of the Base Commander, the Military Bishop, and the Ministry of Church Affairs. They also had to pass a background check by the Gestapo.

Code: 54969

Reserved


German Tropical Shorts - Unissued with Label

German Tropical Shorts - Unissued with Label

An unissued pair of German lightweight Shorts intended for wear in warm climates.
Constructed in a khaki / olive twill, the Shorts are in excellent unissued condition and retain their original stores label.
The fly is closed by four dishes alloy buttons with a further two at waist level. The waist itself has belt loops and a cotton webbed belt with a three claw buckle.
The plain front has two diagonal slash pockets and a horizontal open watch pocket with ring for the fob. The back has on horizontal opening pocket with one dished alloy button.
Inside, the waistband is lined with an undyed cotton, the pockets formed of the same material. The waistband also carries the maker’s details.
It would not be possible to upgrade these tropical shorts

Code: 54967

350.00 GBP


Luftwaffe Me110 Upper Wing Panel with Modern Artwork

Luftwaffe Me110 Upper Wing Panel with Modern Artwork

An upper wing forward fuel tank cover panel from an Me110 measuring approximately 128 x 113 cms.
Overall condition is very good with the manufacture’s plate in place, dating the panel to 1942.
The panel has been recently painted black along with a well executed representation of the emblem of night fighter unit NJG 1
A very impressive display piece with modern artwork.

Due to the weight and size, pick up only from the Petersfield area of Hampshire, PO8

Code: 54966

960.00 GBP


Kriegsmarine / Late War Mouthpiece Gas Mask

Kriegsmarine / Late War Mouthpiece Gas Mask

Possibly inspired by the need for a compact Gas Mask alternative for use in the confined spaces of a service vessel or U Boat, Kriegsmarine regulations of March 25TH 1944 introduced a new emergency gas protection breathing device which consisted of a mouthpiece that was designed to fit on any of the standard gasmask filter. The emergency gas protection breathing device was designed to be easily carried and was intended for immediate usage in the event of a surprise gas attack.
This is the first example I have ever seen other than in photographs and is in very good condition, the mouthpiece itself being in excellent condition. The filter is 1938 dated and shows minor surface rush which in no way detracts.
What appears to be the original neck strap is in place but I can find no Kriegsmarine markings, the filters of course be generic.

Code: 53061

150.00 GBP


Shoulder Slips to the 31st Indian Armoured Division, 14th Battery Royal Horse Artillery

Shoulder Slips to the 31st Indian Armoured Division, 14th Battery Royal Horse Artillery

A very good pair of Shoulder Slips to the 31st Indian Armoured Division, 14th Battery Royal Horse Artillery, depicting an embroidered charging elephant on a green felt background above a brass RHS on red felt backing with posts and pins, all on a Khaki slip. Very good condition.
According to Chris Kempton's Divisional History section of his reference work "Loyalty and Honour" the 14th RHA served with the 31st Indian Armoured Division from 8th November 1943 until 10th January 1946. Having been formed in Dhond, India, on 1st September 1942 from 414 Battery and 525 Battery. It then served as part of 7th Armoured Brigade from then until May 1943, in Syria, before moving to 10th Armoured Division in June 1942.
In November 1943, it was reorganised to include 524 Battery and then served with 31st Indian Armoured Division in North Africa and Syria again in March 1944. With the 31st Indian Armoured Division the Regiment then served in Persia, Egypt, Lebanon and Syria, until the end of the war.
The Regiment was disbanded in 1947 making these very rare Shoulder Slips.

Code: 54592

Reserved


British 12th Army Uniform Formation Signs

British 12th Army Uniform Formation Signs

An impressive pair of theatre made Uniform Formation Signs for the British 12 th. Army
Hand embroidered on a red wool background with a blue horizontal rayon strip with off white border, the reverse finished with a khaki cloth. Very good undamaged condition
Formed in the Middle East as H.Q. Force 545 for planning operations in the Mediterranean, was disbanded from 1943/45. HQ was reactivated again in Burma on 28 May 1945, tasked with controlling operations of the Fourteenth Army in Burma and invasion of Malaya by amphibious assault.

Code: 54595

Reserved


British 5 Corps Formation Signs

British 5 Corps Formation Signs

A pair of machine embroidered 5 Corps Formation Signs, applied to a khaki drill cloth to create Shoulder Slips.
Very good overall condition and free from damage.
Originally established in WW1, it was It was recreated in June 1940 during World War II and substantially reorganised in 1942 for participation in Operation Torch. It fought through the Tunisia Campaign and later the Italian Campaign.

Code: 54596

60.00 GBP


Luftwaffe Fallschirm - Division Cuff Band

Luftwaffe Fallschirm - Division Cuff Band

A very good uniform removed “Fallschirm – Division” Cuff Band for enlisted men measuring approximately 460mm x 33mm.
Constructed of smooth dark green wool, the exterior bearing a machine-embroidered silver-grey inscription of “FALLSCHIRM-DIVISION” in Gothic script.
Very good undamaged condition and free from moth.
The first from a superb collection of Fallschirmjager insignia and awards I will be listing over the next few days

Code: 54802

820.00 GBP


1939 Dated Luftwaffe Fliegerbluse. Flak

1939 Dated Luftwaffe Fliegerbluse. Flak

A seemingly unissued and particularly interesting 1939 dated Fliegerbluse with original factory applied shoulder straps, collar patches and red collar piping for a flak regiment. The eagle is original but applied at a later date possibly by a collector.
What makes the Blouse of particular interest is the inclusion of the two slanted and flapped pockets, not introduced until May 1940. Despite the fact that there is a clear 1940 LBA stamp it was manufactured for the Munich depot in 1939.
In volume 1 of Angolia’s “Uniforms and Traditions of the Luftwaffe”, he make the observation that “Blouses are known to exist with hip pockets and without the tucks at the back. As these are marked with a 39 stamp and they are believed to be specimens for test and evaluation by units”. This is perhaps one of these test items.
Made in a blue grey basic cloth it has a five button front closure. The top button is missing but the Blouse was usually worn open to the second button. Each cuff has a hidden strap which can be brought from the inside to close the cuff on an outside button. Both pockets and shoulder straps have a single grey pebbled button, again, not brought in until the 1940 modifications.
Inside, there is a dressings pocket, part twill lining, buttons for a collar protector and one pocket. There are waist laces for a better fit and the straps and hooks to support the belt.
Overall condition and appearance is very good but there are four moth holes on the lower front right side and five on the lower back right side.

Code: 54965

1200.00 GBP


A blue grey Lufwaffe Shirt (Stoffhemd)

A blue grey Lufwaffe Shirt (Stoffhemd)

A blue grey Lufwaffe Shirt (Stoffhemd) issued by order from September 1943 and produced in a soft cotton fabric with an attached collar allowing it to be worn as an outer garment or under the Fliegerbluse or Waffenrock without the need for a liner, which was then abolished
Otherwise virtually identical in cut to the M43 army Pullover Shirt it features two pleated breast pockets with removable buttons and three removable front closure buttons with two (missing) buttons to secure the fixed collar. The collar itself is identical in cut to the Luftwaffe Shirt worn by officers and allows for stiffeners.
Buttons at the double cuffs are in place and would perhaps be better served by cuff links. All buttons are pebbled grey with modern ring clips holding them in place.
Overall condition is very good with two minor holes at the lower front skirt which have been darned.
Original wartime shirts are extremely rare most having been worn to destruction during the post war years of austerity.

Code: 54964

320.00 GBP


Q66 Sud Camouflaged M40 Helmet

Q66 Sud Camouflaged M40 Helmet

An excellent and completely unmolested Q66 M40 Sud Camouflaged Helmet with a lot number of 325 stamped into the rear skirt.
The shell is completely without damage and retains a good 90% of what was perhaps a field spray applied camouflage tan and green paint. Close examination of the left side of the helmets suggests just a suspicion of a Luftwaffe eagle under the paint, absolutely in keeping with helmets in this lot range.
Inside, there is no chinstrap. The liner band fits snugly against the shell and I am pleased to say has not suffered the indignity of having been bent by collectors to inspect a date. The liner itself is very good, without damage and remaining supple, the drawstring still in place.

Code: 54963

3000.00 GBP


German Army Recruiting personnel Armband (Wehrersatzdienststellen Ärmelbinde)

German Army Recruiting personnel Armband (Wehrersatzdienststellen Ärmelbinde)

Worn on the left sleeve of uniformed or non-uniformed personnel and was worn only while the individual was performing the specific duty or function identified by the armband.
The "Wehrersatzdienststellen", (Military Recruiting Service Depot), armband was one of the armbands introduced with the Army Mobilization Order of March 12TH 1937 and was designed for wear by non-uniformed army recruiting personnel.
An impressive armband of a woven white cotton/rayon construction with a black, machine woven, Wehrmacht style eagle with down-swept wings to the obverse centre.
Some surface stains which I do believe may wash off and with the residue three stickers to the reverse from display.

Code: 54961

120.00 GBP


Army Fallschirmjager Badge by Juncker in Aluminium

Army Fallschirmjager Badge by Juncker in Aluminium

An extremely rare second pattern Army Paratroop Badge produced from late 1937 to the beginning of 1939.
An unmarked Juncker this second pattern sought to correct vulnerable areas of the badge such as the rear talon and the beak, the latter reinforced by the provision of a distinctive “beard”.
Aluminium badges remained susceptible to damage however and this example shows the addition of replacement rivets to reaffix the eagle. I have little doubt this is a period repair.
The wreath and Army eagle retain a very good degree of the gilded finish both front and back and close inspection of the reverse of the eagle reveals an owner’s name which has been partially removed.
Pin, hinge and catch are very good.
A nice and I believe combat used example of a rare badge.

Code: 54808

1900.00 GBP


Wehrmacht (Army) Parachutist Badge by FLL Type B. The Brandenburgs

Wehrmacht (Army) Parachutist Badge by FLL Type B. The Brandenburgs

A very rare Fallschirmschützenabzeichen in zinc without maker’s name but displaying the typical manufacturing characteristics of late war Type B badges by Friedrich Linden of Lüdenscheid
Of multi-piece construction with a gilded zinc oak wreath with a Wehrmacht eagle clutching a swastika on the top of the wreath, and three ribbons on the bottom.
Affixed to the badge is a silvered zinc eagle, attached via two ball-rivets to the reverse.
Generally very good condition but with a small crack in the wreath below the rivet at the eagle’s tail feathers.
A late war zinc badge and although the Army Fallschirmjager had amalgamated with the Luftwaffe early in the war, members of the elite Brandenburgs who qualified wore the Army Fallschirmschützenabzeichen.

Code: 54833

2760.00 GBP


Luftwaffe Cockpit Clock Version 1 1938 -40

Luftwaffe Cockpit Clock Version 1 1938 -40

A very nice working example of the First Version of the Junghans Cockpit Clock Fl23885, Bo-UK 1, which is believed to been produced between 1938 and 1940.
These early examples carried no data plate, the serial number impressed into the mounting plate, in this case 26203 As with later versions there is a stop watch function operated by a push button below the winding knob with a subsidiary dial at the bottom of the face showing elapsed time. The winding knob is also used to set the hour and minute hands.
These early versions have a blackened brass rotating bezel with a red pointer and a pressure fit back plate however this example has the bayonet fitting seen on subsequent versions making this a transitional piece. Again with the first version, there is no plate covering the movement which in this case has a number of 25634.There is a good BAL stamp to the rear.
Overall condition is very good. The clock runs well and keeps very good time with all functions operating as they should however, it has not been serviced and is therefore not guaranteed.
A true example of the Junghans Cockpit Clocks in service during the Battle of Britain.

Code: 54957

525.00 GBP


Printed version of the NSDAP Armband.

Printed version of the NSDAP Armband.

Red cotton background with white centre and canted Swastika with ink stamp to the periphery of the white centre showing what appears to be an eagle with folded wings with circular text now longer discernible.
Very good but dirty condition

Code: 54955

120.00 GBP


WW1 German Equipment / Bread Bag Strap

WW1 German Equipment / Bread Bag Strap

A scarce WW1 German Bread Bag Strap in very good condition. As is usually the case there are no markings present, however this example undoubtedly dates from the 1915 to 1916 period since the canvas used is the field grey colour introduced in 1915 (tan before that date) yet the leather ends remain in brown leather, these being blackened from late 1916 onwards.
WW1 Bread Bag Straps in good condition are really rather difficult to find today, they are however an important piece of kit as during that War they were used by all Infantry in the assault to support the weight of the cartridge Pouches. This is because German Infantry did not have "Y straps" in WW1. The cartridge Pouches were usually supported by the Pack, however the Pack was not used in the assault so the Bread Bag Strap was used instead. As such a Bread Bag Strap is the classic item for a German Infantry "in the assault" display as numerous period photos testify.
The canvas on this Bread Bag Strap is strong with the leather ends solid and undamaged, and the sprung clips once more strong and fully functioning. This Bread Bag Strap can thus be used to support Pouches without any problems whatsoever.
The final image shows the Bread Bag Strap laid out with other items of German WW1 equipment that I have equally listed. These extra items do not form part of this sale but are shown for demonstration purposes only. As can be seen the brown leather ends of the Bread Bag Strap match the colour, patina, and condition of this equipment exactly. All the items shown in the final image originally formed a carefully matched equipment set and these were bought from the same advanced German collection in their entirety. For the sake of photographic clarity however I have listed the different elements separately.
An essential but hard to find piece of WW1 German Equipment.

Code: 54953

Reserved


WW1 German Field Drinking Cup

WW1 German Field Drinking Cup

lovely example of the WW1 German soldier's Drinking Cup.
Used by the German soldier in the field they were carried suspended from one of the Bread Bag's belt loops. At the start of the War they were made of aluminium but as the War progressed their manufacture was switched to the steel and field grey enamel format such as here in order to save aluminium.
These are really rather difficult to find in any event, but quite exceptionally this example is in very good condition with only minimal enamel loss to the rim.
The final image shows the field Drinking Cup laid out with other items of German WW1 equipment that I have listed. These extra items do not form part of this sale but are shown for demonstration purposes only.
A wonderful item.

Code: 54952

80.00 GBP